Propagating a pothos plant

Must Read

Riley Georgia
Riley Georgia
I'm Riley Georgia, a writer exploring the wonders of gardens. My stories celebrate the beauty of plants and the joy of gardening. Let's discover together the magic of nature, from seeds to blossoms, and cultivate a deeper connection with the earth. Join me on this garden-filled journey!

Propagating a pothos plant, also known as Devil’s Ivy, is a simple and rewarding process. There are a few different methods you can use to propagate pothos, including water propagation, soil propagation, and air layering. Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to propagate a pothos plant:

  • Select a healthy and mature pothos plant: Look for a well-established pothos plant with several mature leaves. Healthy plants will have vibrant green leaves without any signs of disease or damage.
  • Choose a propagation method: Decide whether you want to propagate your pothos plant through water, soil, or air layering. Each method has its advantages, so you can choose the one that suits you best.
    • Water propagation: This is the most common method. It involves placing cuttings in water until they develop roots.
    • Soil propagation: This method involves planting cuttings directly into soil.
    • Air layering: Air layering is a more advanced technique that involves creating a rooting chamber on the parent plant to encourage root growth before separating the new plant.
  • Prepare the cuttings: Take a sharp, clean pair of scissors or pruning shears and cut a healthy stem below a node (the point where a leaf is attached to the stem). Each cutting should be around 4-6 inches long and have at least two or three leaves.
  • Water propagation method:
    • Fill a small jar or glass with clean water.
    • Remove any leaves from the lower part of the cutting so that only the top leaves remain.
    • Place the cutting in the jar, making sure that the bottom node is submerged in the water.
    • Put the jar in a bright location, away from direct sunlight.
    • Change the water every few days to keep it fresh.
    • After a few weeks, you should start to see roots forming. Once the roots are about an inch long, you can transfer the cutting to a pot with well-draining soil.
  • Soil propagation method:
    • Fill a small pot with well-draining potting soil.
    • Remove any leaves from the lower part of the cutting, leaving only the top leaves.
    • Make a small hole in the soil using your finger or a pencil.
    • Insert the cutting into the hole, making sure the bottom node is covered with soil.
    • Lightly press the soil around the cutting to secure it.
    • Water the soil, making sure it is moist but not waterlogged.
    • Place the pot in a bright location with indirect sunlight.
    • Keep the soil slightly moist during the propagation process.
    • After a few weeks, the cutting should develop roots, and you can treat it like a regular pothos plant.
  • Air layering method:
    • Select a healthy stem on the parent plant and make a small vertical incision just below a node.
    • Gently peel back the bark from the stem to expose the inner wood.
    • Dust the exposed area with rooting hormone powder to promote root growth.
    • Wrap the exposed area with moist sphagnum moss and secure it with plastic wrap or aluminum foil.
    • Keep the moss consistently moist by misting it with water.
    • After a few weeks or when roots have formed, cut below the root zone and pot it in well-draining soil.

Be patient during the propagation process, as it can take several weeks for the new roots to develop. Once your new pothos plant has established roots, you can care for it like a mature plant, providing it with proper light, water, and occasional fertilization.

When to plant propagated pothos

Once your pothos cuttings have developed roots, you can plant them in a pot or container filled with well-draining soil. It’s best to wait until the roots are at least an inch long before transplanting the cuttings. This typically takes a few weeks, depending on the propagation method and environmental conditions.

Related story:
Types of rubber plants

When the roots have reached a suitable length, follow these steps to plant the propagated pothos:

  • Choose a pot: Select a pot or container that has drainage holes at the bottom. Pothos plants prefer pots with good drainage to prevent waterlogging and root rot.
  • Prepare the potting soil: Fill the pot with well-draining potting soil. You can use a mixture of regular potting soil and perlite or vermiculite to improve drainage.
  • Dig a hole: Create a small hole in the soil using your finger or a small tool. The hole should be deep enough to accommodate the roots of the propagated pothos cutting.
  • Plant the cutting: Place the cutting in the hole, making sure that the roots are fully covered with soil. Gently press the soil around the base of the cutting to secure it in place.
  • Water the plant: After planting, water the pothos thoroughly to settle the soil and provide moisture to the roots. Ensure that excess water drains out of the bottom of the pot.
  • Provide appropriate care: Place the potted pothos in a location with bright, indirect light. Pothos plants can tolerate a range of light conditions but prefer bright, indirect light for optimal growth. Water the plant when the top inch of soil feels dry, and avoid overwatering.

By following these steps, your propagated pothos should be off to a good start in its new pot. Monitor its growth and adjust watering and lighting as needed. Pothos are relatively low-maintenance plants and can thrive indoors with proper care.

How to plant propagated pothos

To plant a propagated pothos successfully, follow these steps:

  • Prepare the pot: Choose a pot that has drainage holes at the bottom to prevent waterlogging. The pot should be slightly larger than the root ball of your propagated pothos.
  • Fill the pot with soil: Use a well-draining potting mix specifically formulated for houseplants. You can also create a mixture of equal parts potting soil, perlite, and peat moss for improved drainage. Fill the pot about halfway with the soil mixture.
  • Remove the propagated pothos from its container: Gently remove the propagated pothos from its current container. If the plant is in a small pot or tray, you can carefully squeeze the sides or tap it upside down to slide the root ball out. If the plant is in a water propagation container, gently remove it from the water and rinse off any remaining gel or rooting hormone.
  • Examine the roots: Take a look at the roots of the propagated pothos. If there are any long, straggly roots, you can trim them back to encourage new growth.
  • Plant the propagated pothos: Place the propagated pothos into the prepared pot, positioning it in the center. Add more soil mixture around the roots, gently firming it down to ensure the plant is stable. Leave a small space between the top of the soil and the rim of the pot to allow for watering.
  • Water the plant: After planting, give the pothos a thorough watering. Water until you see water draining out from the bottom of the pot. This ensures that the soil is evenly moist and helps settle the plant in its new container.
  • Find the right spot: Pothos plants thrive in bright, indirect light. Place your potted pothos in a location with moderate to bright light, away from direct sunlight. A north or east-facing window is usually ideal. Pothos can tolerate lower light conditions but may not grow as vigorously.
  • Maintain proper care: Keep the soil evenly moist but not soggy. Allow the top inch of soil to dry out before watering again. Overwatering can lead to root rot, so it’s important to strike a balance. Fertilize your pothos every 2-4 weeks during the growing season using a balanced, water-soluble houseplant fertilizer.
Related story:
Top 7 Tips for Caring for a Coffee Plant

Monitor your newly planted propagated pothos closely in the first few weeks. If you notice any signs of stress, adjust the lighting or watering accordingly. With proper care, your pothos will establish itself and continue to grow into a beautiful, lush plant.

Where to cut pothos plant for propagation

When propagating a pothos plant, you’ll want to make your cut just below a node. Nodes are the points on the stem where leaves are attached. This is where the new roots will develop from. Here’s a step-by-step guide on where to cut your pothos plant for propagation:

  • Identify a healthy stem: Choose a mature stem on your pothos plant that is long enough to provide a sufficient cutting. Make sure the stem you select is healthy, without any signs of disease or damage.
  • Locate a node: Look along the stem and find a node, which is a small bump or swelling where a leaf is attached. Nodes are typically spaced a few inches apart on the stem.
  • Prepare your cutting: Using clean, sharp scissors or pruning shears, make a clean cut just below the node. The cutting should be about 4-6 inches long and include at least two or three leaves. The top part of the cutting should have leaves intact, while the bottom part should be free of leaves.
  • Repeat for multiple cuttings (optional): If you want to propagate multiple pothos plants, you can make additional cuttings following the same process, ensuring that each cutting has at least one node.

Pothos plants are known for their ability to root readily, so even if you accidentally cut above a node, there’s a chance that it will still produce roots. However, cutting just below a node increases the likelihood of successful propagation.

You have taken the cuttings, you can proceed with your preferred propagation method, such as water propagation, soil propagation, or air layering. Follow the earlier instructions provided based on your chosen method to successfully propagate your pothos plant.

How to cut pothos plant to propagate

To cut a pothos plant for propagation, follow these steps:

  • Gather the necessary tools: You will need a clean pair of sharp scissors, pruning shears, or a clean knife. Make sure the tools are sanitized to minimize the risk of transmitting any diseases or pests.
  • Select a healthy stem: Look for a mature, healthy stem on your pothos plant. Choose a stem that has several leaves and is long enough to provide a sufficient cutting. Avoid stems that show signs of disease or damage.
  • Locate a node: Nodes are the points on the stem where leaves are attached. They appear as small bumps or swellings. Identify a node on the stem where you want to make your cutting. It’s best to cut just below a node to increase the chances of successful root development.
  • Make a clean cut: Position your scissors, pruning shears, or knife just below the chosen node. With a swift and clean motion, make a diagonal cut through the stem. Ensure that the cutting is about 4-6 inches long. This length allows for enough stem to be submerged in water or planted in soil for propagation.
  • Remove lower leaves (optional): If desired, you can remove the lower leaves from the bottom part of the cutting. This step is not necessary but can prevent the leaves from rotting when submerged in water or buried in soil during propagation.
  • Prepare for propagation: Once you have made your cutting, you can proceed with your preferred propagation method:
    • Water propagation: Place the cutting in a glass or jar filled with clean water. Make sure the bottom node is submerged, while the remaining leaves are above the waterline. Change the water every few days to keep it fresh.
    • Soil propagation: Plant the cutting in a pot with well-draining potting soil. Bury the bottom node and lower part of the stem in the soil while keeping the leaves above the soil surface. Water the soil lightly and ensure it stays slightly moist during the propagation process.
    • Air layering (advanced method): This method involves creating a rooting chamber on the parent plant and encouraging roots to form before separating the new plant. Air layering is a more complex technique and may require additional research and guidance.
Related story:
chinese money plant yellow leaves Causes and remedy

Label or keep track of the cuttings, especially if you are propagating multiple pothos plants or using different methods. Place the cuttings in a suitable environment based on your chosen propagation method and provide proper care until they develop roots and can be potted as new plants.

Planting pothos after propagation

After propagating your pothos plant through water or soil, you can proceed with planting the newly rooted cuttings. Here’s how to plant pothos after propagation:

  • Prepare a pot: Choose a pot that has drainage holes at the bottom. The size of the pot should accommodate the size of the rooted cutting and allow room for growth. Select a pot that is slightly larger than the root ball of the propagated pothos.
  • Fill the pot with soil: Use a well-draining potting mix specifically formulated for houseplants. Alternatively, you can create a mixture of equal parts potting soil, perlite, and peat moss to enhance drainage. Fill the pot about halfway with the soil mixture.
  • Remove the rooted cutting from the water or soil: If you propagated the pothos in water, gently remove the rooted cutting from the water, allowing any excess water to drain. If you propagated in soil, carefully extract the rooted cutting from the propagation medium, making sure to handle the delicate roots with care.
  • Plant the pothos cutting: Place the rooted cutting into the prepared pot, positioning it in the center. Add more soil mixture around the roots, gently firming it down to ensure the plant is stable. Leave a small space between the top of the soil and the rim of the pot to allow for watering.
  • Water the plant: After planting, water the pothos thoroughly until water drains out from the bottom of the pot. This helps settle the plant in its new container and ensures the soil is evenly moist.
  • Find the right location: Pothos plants thrive in bright, indirect light. Place the potted pothos in a location with moderate to bright light, away from direct sunlight. A north or east-facing window is usually ideal. Pothos can tolerate lower light conditions, but they may not grow as vigorously.
  • Provide proper care: Keep the soil slightly moist but not waterlogged. Allow the top inch of soil to dry out before watering again. Overwatering can lead to root rot, so it’s essential to find the right balance. Fertilize your pothos every 2-4 weeks during the growing season using a balanced, water-soluble houseplant fertilizer.
Related story:
Indoor monstera plant

Monitor the plant closely in the initial weeks after planting to ensure it adjusts well. Over time, your pothos will establish itself and continue to grow. Remember to adjust watering and lighting as needed and provide regular care to maintain a healthy and thriving pothos plant.

Golden pothos plant propagation

Propagating a golden pothos plant (Epipremnum aureum) follows the same general principles as propagating a regular pothos plant. Golden pothos is a popular houseplant with variegated leaves that feature a mix of green and yellow hues. Here’s a step-by-step guide on propagating a golden pothos:

  • Select a healthy stem: Choose a mature, healthy stem on your golden pothos plant. Look for a stem with several well-developed leaves. Ensure the plant is free from diseases or damage.
  • Locate a node: Nodes are the points on the stem where leaves are attached. They appear as small bumps or swellings. Identify a node on the stem where you want to make your cutting. Cut just below the node to increase the chances of successful root development.
  • Make a clean cut: Use clean and sharp scissors or pruning shears to make a diagonal cut just below the chosen node. Aim for a cutting that is about 4-6 inches long, with at least two or three leaves. The top part of the cutting should have leaves intact, while the bottom part should be free of leaves.
  • Remove lower leaves (optional): You can remove the lower leaves from the bottom part of the cutting if desired. This step can prevent the leaves from rotting when submerged in water or buried in soil during propagation.
  • Choose a propagation method: Golden pothos can be propagated through water or soil. You can choose the method that suits you best. Water propagation is the most common and straightforward method.
    • Water propagation: Place the cutting in a glass or jar filled with clean water. Ensure that the bottom node is submerged in water while the leaves remain above the waterline. Change the water every few days to keep it fresh.
    • Soil propagation: Plant the cutting in a pot with well-draining potting soil. Bury the bottom node and lower part of the stem in the soil while keeping the leaves above the soil surface. Water the soil lightly and ensure it stays slightly moist during the propagation process.
  • Provide the right conditions: Place the propagated golden pothos cutting in a location with bright, indirect light. Avoid direct sunlight, as it can scorch the leaves. Maintain a warm and humid environment to encourage root development.
  • Monitor and care for the cutting: Check the water or soil regularly to ensure the appropriate moisture level. Avoid overwatering, as it can lead to root rot. Depending on the method used, roots will start to develop in a few weeks. Once the roots are about an inch long, or when you see sufficient root growth, you can consider transplanting the cutting into a pot with well-draining soil.

After transplanting, continue caring for the golden pothos as you would for a mature plant, providing it with proper light, water, and occasional fertilization. With time and care, the propagated golden pothos will grow into a beautiful and vibrant plant.

Latest Posts

More Similar Articles Like This