Private And Comfortable Wooden House CM In Belgium

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Jane Mullock
Jane Mullockhttps://myfancyhouse.com/
I'm Jane, a writer fascinated by houses. My stories are about the magic of homes and the people in them. Let's explore the secrets and joys houses hold, and discover the amazing stories behind every door. Come join me on this house-loving adventure!

Designed by Christophe Meersman and Bruno Vanbesien, this contemporary, private residence can be found in Zellik, Belgium and flaunts no less than 2,368 square feet of living space. The architect in charge of this 2011 project is named Christophe Meersman, and he envisioned a wooden façade that would allow the home to blend easily with its neighboring buildings.

The front of the house was indeed adorned with wooden paneling made out of tropical hardwood, but the roof and the back of the house was also enveloped in the same material in order to create a balanced and harmonious look. The front window that faces the street was placed at an unusually elevated position in order to ensure utmost privacy. However, the rear of the abode features great transparency thanks to a series of large windows placed at the ground level and at the first floor. In order to efficiently blur the boundaries between the indoor and outdoor areas, the architect decided to place a terrace adjacent to the second floor bedroom, which means that the owner can always spend some time outside or even sleep outside by bringing the bed on the terrace.

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Interior highlights include a metal staircase that is bathed in natural light thanks to a light shaft.

Photos by Tim Van de Velde

Designed by Christophe Meersman and Bruno Vanbesien, this contemporary, private residence can be found in Zellik, Belgium and flaunts no less than 2,368 square feet of living space. The architect in charge of this 2011 project is named Christophe Meersman, and he envisioned a wooden façade that would allow the home to blend easily with its neighboring buildings.

The front of the house was indeed adorned with wooden paneling made out of tropical hardwood, but the roof and the back of the house was also enveloped in the same material in order to create a balanced and harmonious look. The front window that faces the street was placed at an unusually elevated position in order to ensure utmost privacy. However, the rear of the abode features great transparency thanks to a series of large windows placed at the ground level and at the first floor. In order to efficiently blur the boundaries between the indoor and outdoor areas, the architect decided to place a terrace adjacent to the second floor bedroom, which means that the owner can always spend some time outside or even sleep outside by bringing the bed on the terrace.

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Interior highlights include a metal staircase that is bathed in natural light thanks to a light shaft.

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