Villa Rotonda In Goirle, The Netherlands

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Featuring an outstanding design that involves a classic saddle roof and modern, minimalistic elements, Villa Rotonda can be found in Goirle, The Netherlands, and it was completed in 2010 by Bedaux de Brouwer Architects. The abode offers 4,477 square feet of living space and was constructed under the supervision of Pieter Bedaux and Thomas Bedaux, who made sure that the end result would meet contemporary standards of comfort and convenience.


The residence is located in a relatively noisy area, and so in their quest to ensure tranquility, the architects decided to create a special protective area on one side of the house as well as an open, welcoming area on the other. Facing the street, the abode features a single window, but a patio with a water basin placed immediately behind the façade ensures the much needed natural light while further sheltering the main living areas from the street noise.


On the other side of the house, the garden façade is completely transparent thanks to the extensive use of glass elements at the ground level and halfway to the second floor. As far as its appearance is concerned, Villa Rotonda impresses with a delicate contrast between its dark gray slate roof tiles and medium gray brick walls.

From the architect:

In Villa Rotonda, completed July 2010,  the archetypical “house with saddle roof” has been abstracted to its vernacular essentials. The design of this house in Goirle is a collaboration of architects Pieter and Thomas Bedaux of Bedaux De Brouwer Architects. In the design they quietly continue the legacy of their grandfather Jos. Bedaux who started the firm in 1937. Yet, the building also showcases the minimalist modernist twist which they are better known for these days.

The house is situated near a busy round-about with lots of noisy traffic. Measures had to be taken to guarantee a comfortable and quiet living space. This basic constraint became the leitmotiv for a building with two opposite characters; a closed-off protective side and an open inviting transparent side.

The protective side is apparent when looking at the house from the round-about. The street façade is entirely closed with the exception of a single window. However, this doesn’t prelude a dark interior. Right behind the façade a patio with a water basin cleverly allows light to enter whilst pushing the living area’s even further back; away from the busy street.

A long wall wraps around the perimeter of the lot. This wall ensures privacy and encloses the spacious garden. It makes it possible for the residents to enjoy light, air and the outside. Here, the inviting open side reveals itself. The garden façade is rendered completely transparent, displaying a collage of lively spaces. Glass extends from ground level up to halfway the second level. A recess in the first floor makes it possible to experience the full height. The result of these spatial inventions is that the garden is pulled inside even more.

The house is clad in a medium gray brick with dark gray slate roof tiles. A material pallet typical of the Bedaux repertoire.  The characteristic front façade chimneys also remind of earlier designs by previous generations.

Architect In Charge: Pieter Bedaux, Thomas Bedaux
Design Team: Koen de Witte, Kees Paulussen, Rien Lagerwerf, Cees de Rooy
Area: 415.0 sqm
Year: 2010
Photographs: Michel Kievits

Landscape Architect: Puur Groenprojecten, Liempde
Construction: H4D raadgevend Ingenieurs, Dongen
Installations: Eklips Advies, Schijndel
Interior Design: Babs Appels Interieur
Contractor: Houtepen Aannemersbedrijf, Goirle

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